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Welcome to the Official Site for the Ancient Order of Hibernians, Myles Scully, Division One of Yonkers, New York! We are the oldest and largest Irish-American Organization in the United States, and we are dedicated to live by our organization's motto, "FRIENDSHIP, UNITY and CHRISTIAN CHARITY." The Yonkers Division was established on November 1, 1891. Thanks for visiting and we hope you enjoy our new and improved site!

NEXT MEETING


General Membership Meeting

Wednesday, September 6, 2017 @ 7:00 pm

Francey Brady's Bar & Rest.
(Formerly Tyrone House)

72 Main Street
Yonkers NY 10701

(914) 226-8644



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Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Irish Historian's Report-Maude Gonne MacBride


Irish Historian’s Report


Division One is honored to share Irish History articles provided by The National Historian of The Ancient Order of Hibernians
 


A.O.H. National Historian Michael McCormack



Maude Gonne MacBride
by Mike McCormack


                     One of the least known today, yet the most influential Irish Revolutionaries of her time, was a lady named Maud Gonne. She was born on Dec. 20, 1865, in England, to a British army colonel of Irish descent and an Irish mother.  Her mother died when Maud was only six and she and her sister were sent to France to be educated.  In 1882, her father was posted to Dublin Castle and he brought his two daughters with him and Maud assumed the role of hostess of the household.  She grew into a stunningly beautiful woman – six feet tall, pretty face, hour-glass figure and long, wavy, red hair; she was widely praised as one of the beauties of the age.

Maude Gonne MacBride
          
                         Maud’s father died in 1886 leaving her financially independent.  She moved back to France after a tubercular hemorrhage and met and fell in love with French journalist Lucien Millevoye, editor of a radical newspaper, ‘La Patrie.’  The pair worked together for both Irish and French nationalist causes.  Maud ended her relationship with Millevoye in the late 1890s, but not before she had two children by him: a daughter, Iseult and one that died in infancy.

                   Maud had been introduced to Fenianism by John O’Leary, a veteran of the 1848 Young Irelander uprising and nationalist leader Tim Harrington recognized that this beautiful, intelligent young woman could be an asset to the nationalist cause.  He sent her to Donegal, where mass evictions were taking place.  A local newspaper documented her coming as “a Celtic Goddess arriving on a white charger to free the oppressed people of Donegal.”  A powerful and emotional speaker, she was successful in organizing the locals in protest against the evictions.  The fact that she fled to France to avoid arrest is a measure her success.

                   In 1889, John O’Leary introduced Maud to a man whose infatuation with her would last most of his life: poet William Butler Yeats.  Yeats proposed to Maud in 1891, and was refused, but through her influence, he became involved with Irish nationalism, later joining the Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB).  At that time, the IRB was a secret organization, but Maud brought it into public prominence with her many protests against slum landlords and the cruel eviction laws of her day.  She also managed to attract police and political attention when she vehemently protested the celebration of Queen Victoria’s diamond jubilee.

                 Maud helped Yeats found the National Literary Society of London in 1891, the same year she refused his first marriage proposal.  Undaunted, Yeats proposed again and even proposed to Maud’s daughter by Millevoye – also unsuccessfully.  Returning to Paris, and to Millevoye, Maud published a nationalist newsletter called ‘L’Irelande Libre’ (Free Ireland).  She worked tirelessly raising funds for the movement, traveling to the US, Scotland, and England.  By now the name of Maud Gonne was well known among Irish nationalists and she was called Ireland’s Joan of Arc.


Maud Gonne McBride on her way to cast her vote

                  Returning to Ireland, she co-founded the Transvaal Committee, which supported the Afrikaners in the Boer War, and on Easter Sunday 1900 she co-founded Inghinidhe na hÉireann (Daughters of Erin), a revolutionary women’s society for whose monthly journal she wrote many political and feminist articles.  Somehow, while doing all this, she found time to star on stage in Yeats play, ‘Cathleen ní Houlihan,’ which Yeats had written specifically for her.  It was an incredibly emotional nationalist drama that debutedin Dublin on April 2, 1902 and influenced many to join the Irish volunteers in the 1916 rising.

                  In 1900, in Paris, Irish politician Arthur Griffith introduced Maud to Major John MacBride, who had been second in command of the Irish Brigade that fought on the Afrikaner side in the Boer War.  In 1903 Maud married MacBride.  Although the marriage produced a son, Seán, it was short-lived and the couple separated.  Maud continued to write political articles and in 1910 she joined Constance Markievicz, James Connolly and Jim Larkin in a campaign to feed the poor children of Dublin.    When it was arranged that King Edward visit Dublin, Maude helped form a Citizen’s Watch Committee and spoke before a rally of the Irish Parliamentary Party damning their support of the visit.  After her speech, an hour-long fight broke out which led to the ruin of the Irish Parliamentary Party.  Sinn Fein rose from its ashes.

                 During World War One, she worked with the Red Cross in France and returned to Ireland in 1917.  She found Ireland in turmoil after the Easter Rising of 1916 and the execution of the rising leaders, including her estranged husband, John MacBride.  Within a year she was jailed by the British for her part in the anti-conscription movement.  This was part of the trumped up “German Plot” that the British used to discredit anti-conscription activity.  Maud was interned at Holloway Jail for six months along with Hanna Sheehy Skeffington, Kathleen Clarke, Countess Markievicz and others.  After she was released, she worked for the White Cross for relief of Irish victims during the War of Independence.


Maud Gonne McBride at a political rally in 1937

               When Ireland’s Civil War came, Maud supported the anti-treaty side. She helped to found the Women’s Prisoners Defense League to help Republican prisoners and their families.  In 1923, she once again found herself imprisoned, this time by the Irish Free State government. Along with 91 other women, Maud went on hunger strike.  The Free State government released her after 20 days.  In 1927, after government leader Kevin O’Higgins was assassinated and several IRA men were indiscriminately arrested, she organized a public demonstration which filled Dublin’s streets and the men were later released.  For the rest of her life Maud would continue to support the Republican cause and work for the Women’s Prisoners Defense League, which mobilized again in defense of Republican prisoners in 1935.

               Maud Gonne MacBride died on April 27, 1953, but her influence on Ireland and the world continued after her death through her son, Seán MacBride.  As a young man, Seán fought on the Republican side in the Civil War and later carried on his mother’s crusade for the fair treatment of political prisoners, not just in Ireland, but all over the world.  Seán was one of the founders of Amnesty International and, in 1974, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.  Maud Gonne MacBride is buried in the Republican plot in Glasnevin Cemetery, a fitting final tribute to the woman who was referred to as Ireland’s Joan of Arc.
Friday, April 5, 2013

Yonkers United Ireland Resolution 2013



A Resolution for a United Ireland




Here is a copy of a resolution adopted by The Yonkers City Council calling on both The Irish and British Governments to fully implement all of the provisions listed in The Good Friday Agreement.  Division One would like to thank Mayor Mike Spano, City Council President Chuck Lesnick, and all of our City Council Members for their support.







Monday, April 1, 2013

Presidents Message April 2013


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Division One President Kevin Ellis


April, 2013

Brothers,

Let me first congratulate the entire membership on an outstanding job during the Saint Patrick’s Day marching season. Division One participated in over 4 St. Patrick’s Day parades this year, and the turnout was bigger and better than ever! That’s a lot of “Boots on the Ground” as they say, and I have received many compliments from all corners on how well we presented ourselves as an organization during the parades. Every member can take pride in a job well done!

As a Division, we now turn our attention to our Annual Charity Golf Outing which will take place atThe Ardsley Country Club on Monday, April 29th. As you may know, this is our chief fundraising event every year, and it requires the support form every member to make it a success. Hole sponsorships are the key! We can never relax and assume that our sponsors of the past will carry us through. We must always be collecting new sponsors in order for our Charities and Missions Program to grow and reach the next level. It would be a blockbuster event if every member could bring in 1 new hole sponsor this year.

As we look further down the calendar to future events that will be coming up, we will remind you that Division One will host The Major Degree of our Order on Sunday, May 19th. All members who have not taken the degree are strongly urged not to miss this opportunity.

Our final Division meeting in June will take place at Dunwoodie Golf Course, where we will finish the season with a BBQ and celebration.

The AOH NYS Convention will be held in Saratoga Springs July 10-14. I look forward to enjoying some fun filled days in Saratoga with you all!

Finally, The AOH will be dedicating the Commodore John Barry Memorial and Plaza on Friday, September 13th, 2013 on the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis. We will be discussing how we can take part in this historic event.

As always, our Division’s success relies on the efforts of each individual member, and I am confident that we will continue to “raise the bar” again this year!

Yours in our motto,


Kevin Ellis
President, Division One



DIVISION OFFICERS


Chaplain

Rev. Matt Janeczko OFM

President
Kevin Ellis

Vice President
Jim Walsh

Recording Secretary

Robert Eggen

Financial Secretary
Dan Mulvey

Treasurer
Mike Morley

Chairman Standing
Committee

Dennis O'Brien

Marshal
Ronan O'Brien

Sentinel
Scott McGown

AOH TWITTER FEED

CONTACT US

Mailing Address:

A.O.H. Myles Scully
Division One
P.O. Box 1020
Yonkers, NY 10703

Email Address:

aohyonkers@gmail.com

DAILY IRISH WORD

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